Children: Vectors of COVID Spread?

A new study from the UK suggests that children are not, in fact, significant vectors of COVID risk.

How much would you say that having one or more young, unvaccinated children (0-11 year olds) in the household increases the household’s risk for COVID?

Well, luckily we have some empirical data on that.

A massive BMJ study of 12 million people from the UK found that the increase in COVID risk is a whopping 0.01%-0.05% in the household if you’ve got a child 0-11 in the household. The numbers are similar to those living with 12-18 year olds.

Not only were increases in COVID very small, but this did not translate into materially increased risk of COVID-19 mortality.

Can we perhaps stop treating children as second-class vectors of spread? When will their social, educational and emotional needs matter enough to be paramount again?

Author: Steve Murch

Steve’s a Seattle-based entrepreneur and software leader, husband and father of three. He’s American-Canadian, and east-coast born and raised. Steve has made the Pacific Northwest his home since 1991, when he moved here to work for Microsoft. He’s started and sold multiple Internet companies. Politically independent, he writes on occasion about city politics and national issues, and created voter-candidate matchmaker Alignvote in the 2019 election cycle. He holds a BS in Applied Math (Computer Science) and Business from Carnegie Mellon University, a Masters in Computer Science from Stanford University in Symbolic and Heuristic Computation, and an MBA from the Harvard Business School, where he graduated a George F. Baker Scholar. Steve volunteers when time allows with Habitat for Humanity, University District Food Bank, Technology Access Foundation (TAF) and other organizations in Seattle. read more

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